Keyboard Macros on Windows

My new job is forcing me to use Windows. Yes, it sucks a bit, but to make the best of the situation I try to set it up as similar to my Mac environment as I can. My primary editor is SublimeText 2, which is available on both platforms, so that works fine. I have set it up with all package files in Dropbox, so they are automatically shared. More on that later.

A code editor such as that relies heavily on keyboard shortcuts. And those tend to work best with an American keyboard layout. I switched over several years ago on the Mac, and use a keyboard macro program to type all the necessary national characters without having to resort to cumbersome dead key combinations and such.

So when I started using Windows, I immediately looked for a suitable program, and I can really recommend AutoHotkey (http://www.autohotkey.com). It is free, incredibly capable, as it  actually contains a full programming language and can create arbitrarily complex GUI widgets. I currently use just a small part of it, but intend to look at more use cases later. Anyhow, here’s my national characters macros. They may come in handy for someone else.

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I have found new employment

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There. No more lying around on the sofa all day. Starting Monday, I will be working full time at Textalk with various programming and design tasks. Initially, I’ll be doing C++ application programming with Qt, so I’m getting away from the web for a while.

Print from Sublime Text 2 with this plugin

Sublime Text is a fantastic text editor, but it does not let you print. Personally, I don’t mind – I only print very seldom. But there are many entertaining discussions on the discussion forum where people who have bought the program months ago suddenly realize that it does not print, and then make as if the sky has fallen down or some such. Anyhow, Svenax to the rescue!

I started on a very simple plugin last april that just sends the document of the current view to an external command line program for printing. I naturally put the plugin on Github and promoted it a bit in the forum. Nothing much happened for a while, until I got a merge request with substantial enhancements from another Githubber. After having merged that, I took another look at the code and decided to rewrite it pretty much from scratch to clean it up and remove code duplication.

This new plugin has been submitted to Package Control, the semi-official package manager for Sublime Text extensions. Looking at the merge request queue, it seems to take about two weeks before requests get integrated. Until then you can install directly by selecting Package Control: Add Repository and adding https://github.com/svenax/SublimePrint. Happy printing!

ETA: It is now available in Package Control under the name Simple Print Function.

Source code for sheet music archive

I have used the Sheet music archive as an opportunity to learn a little about coding WordPress plugins. I think the code is good enough now to show to the world. 🙂 So, take a look on https://github.com/svenax/wp-plugin-sheetmusic/ if you are interested.

The plugin itself is pretty simple. I have also started on some general WordPress support classes that may come in handy if I decide to code more plugins. We’ll see … Continue reading

Happy New Year!

fireworksHappy new 2013 from all of me to all of you!

This will be an awesome year for sure. Did you know that 2013 is the first year with all different digits since 1987? Isn’t that amazing?

The sheet music archive is live again

One of the interesting features of my old web site was the sheet music archive, where all my bagpipe music was available and searchable in a number of ways. This was something I had programmed myself using the Drupal API to get it to display. It took me a while to get the same functionality going in WordPress. The plugin API is completely different – no surprise there. I took the opportunity to change my code to the better. I might publish this plugin on Github later so you all can admire it.

Anyways, here is the sheet music archive in all it’s glory. Enjoy!

Merry anti-christmas to you all

Evil SantaHooray! This year I will be celebrating anti-christmas all by myself, just me, some nice food, cigars and whisky. It will be great – assuming of course that the world did not end at the 21:st as some apparently think. But to hedge my bets, I’m posting this little celebratory note already, instead of waiting until christmas eve as would be proper.

Anyways, have a great time whatever you do and where ever you may be on the day.

The Fronter era is over

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Yeah, hit it hard!

There, the last working day for Fronter has passed last Friday. It was a pretty surreal experience, since we all had the hard disks of our computers destroyed as a part of the ISO security procedures. It looked like this …

While this was going on, we all stood around drinking beer and cheering the destruction on. I did mention surreal, didn’t I? We then ended the day with a final drink-up at Haket. Now on to find something new to do. Wish me luck.

Multi-target publishing with Markdown

I have for a long time been a fan of writing everything as plain text. This started with me using LaTeX, which I still do when I want a perfectly formatted result. However, the last few years I have taken to using some of the many Markdown variants available. This has several advantages: First and foremost, the source is perfectly readable as-is, which makes it ideal for readme files and the like. And you can generate multiple output formats, depending of course on what markdown variant you use.

I initially started using Asciidoc, which is really good, and can generate output in HTML, PDF, ODF, and several different slideshow formats. However, it is not based on standard Markdown, but uses it’s own slightly different syntax. This is annoying if you sometimes also need to use normal Markdown. Recently I have switched to Pandoc, which is based on MultiMarkdown syntax with some extensions. It can generate oodles of different output formats, several of them text based, which for instance makes it easy to write MediaWiki pages. I always have problems remembering MediaWiki’s fiddly syntax, and having to write things like '''''bla''''' just makes me cringe. Continue reading